Monday, February 18, 2013

Peonies In the City of Roses

Peonies are my favorite flower, the only problem is I happen to live in an area where they do not grow very well (sad face). So Im going to try and grow them in my backyard (happy face) in an area north facing that is cool and has no harsh sun light should be the perfect place from them to grow. Cross fingers and toes and we will see what happen (hopeful face).

Peony Festive Maxima 

Mine will hopefully look like this someday,  if and when im successful in the next few months I will have the face of the kid in the Home Alone movie ! 

Idea for my next tattoo 

Monday, February 11, 2013

Return of Gardening Season !!

This is a picture of an empty potting table, an old flea market coffee shop table that i've converted into a potting table that has not been used in months but thats about to change! Valentine's Day and Lincoln birthday are but only two of the events that happen in February, the other is the start-prep of  backyard gardens.

Two weeks ago I started planting wild flowers outside, I will keep you updated to there progress.

To help me out I have been relaying on Better Homes and Garden web site "what to plant in February" for ideas and information. To help you out below are a few ideas from their site, the web page is also include.

Happy seeding !

Better Homes and Garden:

Planting Nursery Plants -- Plant warm-season annual flowers and vegetables (tomatoes, peppers, marigolds, petunias and the like) after all danger of frost has passed but in enough time for them to beat the summer heat. In hot desert areas, for example, that means no later than mid-February. If in doubt, give a quick call to the garden center nearest you. Microclimates and growing conditions can vary radically within just a few miles of each other and in places like Southern California, within just a few blocks of each other.
  • Once the soil has warmed to 60 degrees F, plant seeds for corn, green beans, cucumbers, squashes, and other heat-lovers. You'll know the soil is warm enough once you can walk on it comfortably barefoot. Or wait until two weeks after your region's last average frost date.
Fertilizers -- Fertilize roses and fertilize perennials at the end of the month and keep them watered. You can use chemical fertilizers (follow package directions on amount and frequency) or organic fertilizers, such as compost, fish emulsion, and others.
  • In the low desert and other hot areas, feed citrus, avocado, and deciduous trees now. In cooler coastal or higher zones, wait until next month.
  • Late this month or early next, if desired, apply a pre-emergent weed killer tobeds and borders. It will greatly reduce weeds later on. However, it works by preventing seeds from germinating, so don't apply anywhere you're planting seeds.
  • Cut back woody and overgrown perennials. If in doubt, look at the base of the plant. If it is sending up fresh growth there, you can safely cut off the dead or old plant material now.
  • Cut back old foliage from ornamental grasses, liriope (monkey grass) and mondo grass to just a few inches high. (Tip: If you or your neighbor have a power hedge clipper, it will make short work of tough-stalked ornamental grasses.)
  • You can prune evergreens this month, but avoid pruning them later on this spring and summer.
  • Keep up with the harvest of cool-season crops, such as peas, lettuces, and spinach. It will encourage more production. Continue to plant successions of these fast-growers for production over the next several weeks.
What To Plant -- Plant bare-root artichokes, rhubarb, and strawberries now.
  • Clear out debris and muck from the bottom of the water garden, if you have one, and add it to your compost heap.
  • Mulch your garden with 2-3 inches of mulch.
  • Control snails with an organic or chemical bait 


Wednesday, February 6, 2013

Tomato & Vine

Dish soap should not excited me this much but this dish soap came to my attention today and I cannot keep the cap close on my new Method dish soap "Tomato Vine". The scent, tomato vine should already have you jumping up and wanting to rush to target, nothing makes me want to do dish's or act like I do then a great new scent. Now you may have forgotten what the smell of a tomato vine smells like, being it's not tomato growing season but somehow those smart people at method found away to bottle up that smell into dish soap. 

Last year Method partnered up with the talented "queen of bold prints" Orla Kiely for a limited edition line of hand soap, dish soap and all-purpose cleaner's. The line has come back again for a spring collection, features four new fragrances: tomato vine, white nectarine, honeysuckle and cloudburst.

Happy dish washing !! 

method orla-kiely-take-two